Super Bowl LVI Tickets to Be Most Expensive Ever

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Tickets for the upcoming Super Bowl LVI are selling for the highest prices in the history of the game, as two beloved teams prepare to face off in the brand-new SoFi stadium on Feb. 13.

According to data from SeatGeek, the average Super Bowl audience member will pay $10,427 for tickets, whereas StubHub gives a more conservative estimate of $9,800. Stingy football fans will find the cheapest tickets at $7,000, whereas the most expensive tickets are selling for $65,000 before fees.

For many Americans, Super Bowl LIV in 2020 was one of their final memories of normalcy before the arrival of the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus. Super Bowl LV in 2021 was a reflection of the times, with a stadium operating at lower capacity than any Super Bowl prior, and priority tickets given to fully vaccinated healthcare workers.

For many, this Super Bowl will be their first opportunity to see a Super Bowl live since a more innocent time. However, there are a multitude of factors which conspire to make this Super Bowl a uniquely pricey affair.

For one thing, this year’s game will be played in the notoriously expensive Los Angeles—making it the first Super Bowl hosted in the city since 1993. With the Los Angeles Rams playing in their home city, prices will be exacerbated by the high demand among the city’s native residents, as well as by fans of the Cincinatti Bengals, enthusiastic for their home team’s unprecedented success.

Without doubt, inflation also has a role to play in the extravagant price tags for this year’s big game. Earlier this month, inflation was reported to have hit a 39-year high of 7 percent, raising the price for goods and services across the board—football tickets not excluded.

Thus, a perfect storm of factors has made this game an unprecedently costly affair. After years of intermittent interruptions, these prices are a testament to the continuing value of America’s national sport.

Nicholas Dolinger

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Nicholas Dolinger is a business reporter for The Epoch Times and creator of “The Beautiful Toilet” podcast.



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