Swiss Study Shows Young Adults Have Sequelae 10 Months After Infection

Spread the love


Brain fog, fatigue, and other Long Covid symptoms affect the lives of many people who have recovered from COVID-19. It is generally believed that healthy young adults can recover to a large extent after contracting COVID-19.

However, a new Swiss study found that 10 months after contracting the covid, they still have some persistent sequelae, especially Increased BMI (body mass index), high cholesterol, and lower physical stamina, which is suggestive of a higher risk of developing metabolic disorders and possible cardiovascular complications.

An interdisciplinary team from the University of Zurich in Switzerland conducted a study on 493 unvaccinated Swiss soldiers (93 percent male) between the ages of 18 and 30 to analyze the effects of COVID-19 on cardiovascular, lung, kidney, nerve, eye, male reproduction, and psychology.

The experts divided the participants into four groups, including 251 who had tested negative, 177 who had tested positive more than 180 days before the study (an average of 340 days), 19 who had tested positive less than 180 days before the study, and 46 with asymptomatic infections.

The results of the study found that people who tested positive for more than 180 days had a significant trend in metabolic disorders, including increased BMI, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein, compared with those who tested negative. They also exhibited lower physical stamina and increased risk of possible cardiovascular disease.

The research team said that even a mild new coronavirus infection should not be underestimated. These findings have social and public health implications and can guide treatment research and policy support for COVID-19 sequelae in young adults.

The research was published on Aug. 25 in the internationally renowned scientific journal Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Spring Lin

Follow



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.